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    New book for review — let me know if you’re interested:

    >>>
    The University of Chicago Press has just released William James, MD: Philosopher, Psychologist, Physician by Emma K. Sutton (PUB: Dec. 6).

    William James is known as a nineteenth-century philosopher, psychologist, and psychical researcher. Less well-known is how his interest in medicine influenced his life and work, driving his ambition to change the way American society conceived of itself in body, mind, and soul. William James, MD offers an account of the development and cultural significance of James’s ideas and works, and establishes, for the first time, the relevance of medical themes to his major lines of thought.

    About the Book

    The first book to map William James’s preoccupation with medical ideas, concerns, and values across the breadth of his work.

    William James is known as a nineteenth-century philosopher, psychologist, and psychical researcher. Less well-known is how his interest in medicine influenced his life and work, driving his ambition to change the way American society conceived of itself in body, mind, and soul. William James, MD offers an account of the development and cultural significance of James’s ideas and works, and establishes, for the first time, the relevance of medical themes to his major lines of thought.

    James lived at a time when old assumptions about faith and the moral and religious possibilities for human worth and redemption were increasingly displaced by a concern with the medically “normal” and the perfectibility of the body. Woven into treatises that warned against humanity’s decline, these ideas were part of the eugenics movement and reflected a growing social stigma attached to illness and invalidism, a disturbing intellectual current in which James felt personally implicated. Most chronicles of James’s life have portrayed a distressed young man, who then endured a psychological or spiritual crisis to emerge as a mature thinker who threw off his pallor of mental sickness for good. In contrast, Emma K. Sutton draws on his personal correspondence, unpublished notebooks, and diaries to show that James considered himself a genuine invalid to the end of his days. Sutton makes the compelling case that his philosophizing was not an abstract occupation but an impassioned response to his own life experiences and challenges. To ignore the medical James is to misread James altogether.

    About the Author
    Emma K. Sutton is an honorary research fellow at Queen Mary University of London.

    Advance Praise
    “Sutton has not provided the world with yet another biography of philosopher and psychologist, William James. Instead, she has used her impressive research and analytical skills to provide important insights regarding the relationship between James’s many physical and psychological challenges and his intellectual output. Sutton argues that James’s experiences of infirmity have direct effects on his philosophical arguments, not as intellectual irritants but as substantive catalysts for leading to deep insights. This book shows just how thoroughly embodied James’s philosophy truly is, and as such, makes an important contribution to Jamesian scholarship.” D. Micah Hester, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

    “Sutton’s study offers a brilliant new reading of James. Her original approach not only brings new dimensions to issues around illness, pain, health, and medicine—though Sutton performs this with precision—but offers a rare scholarly analysis of his letters, reviews, notebooks, and diaries to provide a fuller picture of his personal life and his intellectual engagements. It shows the vital quality of James’s holistic integration of life and thought and the lived quality of his intellectual concerns around sickness and health. With this work, Sutton shows us that the margins of the archive are as important to Jamesian scholarship as his main works. It is a rich study that roots James’s thinking in the reality of his embodied life and shows that, with a sensitivity to his language, we can see the voice of the physician in his psychology, philosophy, and analysis of religion.” Jeremy Carrette, University of Edinburgh

    “This book changes our perception of James as a philosopher and intellectual. The best extended piece of scholarship on James in a long time.” Sarin Marchetti, Sapienza University